Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from January 5, 2015

War Scenes of Ramesses II

A sketch of one of the name rings with the palimpsest of the "Battle of Kadesh" narrative underneath. Unscrambling these two sets of inscriptions is a difficult task. Note the "spikes" on the oval representing crenellations or towers of a fortress.

War Scenes of Ramesses II

(Left) photo of a palimpsest showing an Egyptian soldier slaying a Hittite prisoner from the Battle of Kadesh narrative. Superimposed over this image are the legs of the god Amun seated on a throne. Wavy lines behind his feet represent the Orontes river from the Battle of Kadesh. (Right) a drawing of the palimpsest

karnak temple

Shasu bedouin try to flee Seti's attack by running toward the town of Canaan on a hill. At the top, two men break their weapons as a sign of surrender. a third man waves his arms in submission.

karnak temple

There are scenes devoted to the presentation of booty and prisoners to the god Amen-Re. The caption over one reads:
"Presentation of tribute by His Majesty to his father Amen...consisting of silver, gold, lapis-lazuli, turquoise, red jasper and every sort of precious stone. The chiefs of the hill countries are in his grasp to fill the workshops of his father Amen."
The hieroglyphic texts also record speeches by the god praising the king for his actions and gifts:
"Welcome in peace. I make you victorious over every foreign land and set fear of you in the heart of the Nine Bows (= all foreign countries). Their chiefs c…

Karnak Temple -War Scenes of Seti I

Returning from his "first campaign of victory," Seti I marches prisoners to the Egyptian border fortress at the town of Tcharu (Tell Hebua). A canal filled with crocodiles divides the two sides of Tcharu. Egyptian archaeologists have discovered both of the Tcharu fortress complexes during recent excavations.

Karnak Temple -War Scenes of Seti I

During a stop in Lebanon, Seti I forces the chiefs of Lebanon to cut down cedar trees.



Karnak Temple -War Scenes of Seti I

the original painting had been effaced and that s what we call a A palimpsest relief in which a figure of the military officer Mehy was replaced with an image of Crown Prince Ramesses, the future Ramesses II.

Texts identify this person as none other than Crown Prince Ramesses! But even the casual observer will note that something strange is going on in these reliefs. There is clearly another figure with a different name over which Ramesses II later carved his own name and image.
For decades, it was thought that this shadowy figure was a disgraced or even a murdered elder brother of Ramesses.but the truth is. The man was a military officer named Mehy. Mehy was only a mid-level officer, but he bore high honorific ti…

the original plan of the tomb of Ramses IV

This fragmentary papyrus was first described by Lepsius. It depicts the ground plan of the rock tomb of Ramses IV, gives measurements of the various rooms and hints at the surrounding mountains (which in reality are white limestone). The rightmost part of the papyrus showing the entrance has been lost, as has the bottom half, but assuming a symmetrical outlay of the tomb the missing parts can easily be filled in.
    The scribe used the traditional Egyptian way of including in the drawing all the aspects thought to be of importance, changing points of view: the double-winged doors and seem No true scale is used: The drawing of rooms and niches etc is approximate, giving an idea of their relationships rather than their dimensions.