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Showing posts from February, 2012

Edfu Temple, Edfu

The Temple of Horus in Edfu (also known as the Temple of Edfu) is considered the best-preserved cult temple in Egypt. This partly because it was built later than most: in the Ptolemaic era from 237 to 57 BC.
Yet despite its later date, it exactly reflects traditional pharaonic architecture and so provides an excellent idea of how all the temples once looked. Edfu is also very large: the second largest in Egypt after Karnak Temple.
The provincial town of Edfu is located about halfway between Luxor (115km away) and Aswan (105km) and 65km north of Kom Ombo. A very popular destination, Edfu is included in virtually all Egyptian tour itineraries and can be reached by taxi or by cruise on the Nile followed by a caleche ride (Horse carriage).

History In 332 BC, Alexander the Great conquered Egypt. After his death in 323, his successors ruled Egypt under the Ptolemaic Dynasty. This was the last dynasty of independent Egypt. The Ptolemies were Greeks but presented themselve…

Temple of Karnak in Luxor

The temple of Karnak was known as Ipet-isut (Most select of places) by the ancient Egyptians. It is a city of temples built over 2000 years and dedicated to the Theben triad of Amun, Mut and Khonsu.

This derelict place is still capable of overshadowing many of the wonders of the modern world and in its day must have been awe inspiring.

For the largely uneducated ancient Egyptian population this could only have been the place of the gods. It is the mother of all religious buildings, the largest ever made and a place of pilgrimage for nearly 4,000 years. Although todays pilgrims are mainly tourists. It covers about 200 acres 1.5km by 0.8km The area of the sacred enclosure of Amon alone is 61 acres and would hold ten average European cathedrals.The great temple at the heart of Karnak is so big, St Peter's, Milan and Notre Dame Cathedrals could be lost within its walls. The Hypostyle hall at 54,000 square feet with its 134 columns is still the largest room of any religiou…

Egypt Nile -Agriculture &irrigation system

Egypt Nile -Agriculture &irrigation system



Egypt has a soil of sand, and as we have already said, depends on the annual overflow of the Nile for its fertility. In the dry season, to supply gardens and fields with water, pumps of various sorts are used. The "Shadoof" is a very ancient invention for raising water. It consists of "two posts about five feet high and three feet apart, connected at the top by a horizontal bar; across this is a branch of a tree having at one end a weight composed of mud, and at the other suspended to it by two palm sticks, a bucket made of basket work or matting or of a hoop with wooden stuff or leather." One man may work this machine and lift water as much as six or eight feet by it. He may keep on the whole day bowing and rising as he works, doing it all in graceful fashion. (Source: Earthly Footsteps of the Man of Galilee, p. 46.)

Around 6000 BC Agriculture appeared in Egypt , when historical studies showed that the cit…

Astronomy IN ANCIENT EGYPT

Astronomy was very important to the ancient Egyptians, who observed the sky periodically. The astronomers named what they saw in the sky and used their observations to create the Egyptian calendar. The beginning of the Egyptian year was declared when there was a flood, as they noticed that the flood begins with the star Sirius, also known as the Dog Star, the brightest star in the sky. This incident represented the beginning of the agricultural year in Egypt. The year had 365 days divided into 12 months and each month had 30 days. They made the remaining five days feast days, called the Epagomenal Days, or the days upon the year, and added them at the end of the year. Months of the year were divided into three seasons, namely: the flood season, the planting season, and the harvest season. The year, the season, the month and the day in which the king assumed power was usually recorded by the Egyptians in their documents.

The ancient Egyptians used instruments or indicat…

Single consonant hieroglyphs; part two

Single consonant signs were often used as phonetic complements (extra glyphs to confirm the phonetic elements of a word which also has double or triple consonant signs within it). The Ancient Egyptians also used them to write foreign names. Learning these signs is the basis for any study of Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphs.Learning these signs is the basis for any study of Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphs.

n
n (rare)
s
t or T
T(tj) or t
T(tj) or t
H (emphatic h)
k
g (rare)
g (rare)
g (rare)
s
g
g
t
d (rare)
j or y
w
h (kh or x)
m
m







Here are some  trips  designed primarily for the traveler who wants to learn more about the ancient Egyptian language while exploring Egypt's classic monuments. It includes a rather intensive two week course in understanding Hieroglyphic inscriptions, presented by Dr. Ahmed Sabry (beginning course) and Muhamed Khaleel, ABD, University of Cairo, much of it on site. There will be practical exercises, classroom instruction and p…