Skip to main content

View of the east side of the settlement as seen towards west
Settlement
Temples
Chapels
Tombs
Rock shrine
Huts
Collections
Take a stroll along the eastern (lower) side of the settlement of Deir el-Medina, viewing each house from east towards west. The main
cemetery can be seen at the top of the photographs in the distance.
Scroll to the right to view all the houses.
This house used to belong to Neferhotep
Ipuy' house
This house used to belong to Ramose
Kaha's house is on the right
Plan of a typical Deir el-Medina house. Drawn by Lenka Peacock, after a drawing of Mary Winkes, in Pharaoh's workers.
Although the houses in the village varied in size they followed a fairly standard plan. The first room very often contained a rectangular
mud brick structure partially or fully enclosed except for an opening on the long side, which was approached by three steps. Bruyère found
remains of these structures in twenty eight of the sixty eight houses known to him at the site. The function of the bed-like constructions
is still being discussed by Egyptologists today. It has been suggested that they could have functioned as a birthing or nursing bed, or a
bed-altar to an ancestor cult. Fragments from several paintings from the exterior panels of some of these structures specifically involve
themes in female life: labour, childbirth and daily grooming. It is assumed that the villagers might have worshipped figures of deities or
supplicated a recently deceased relative within these bed-altars.
Recently it has been suggested (Brooker, 2009, p. 44-53) that the front rooms at Deir el-Medina were used as gardens. The suggestion
is supported by existence of several clay models of houses from other sites in Egypt displaying enclosed courtyards within the frontal
space. Archaeological evidence indicates that gardens were created on lower levels than the houses. The majority of floors in the front
rooms at Deir el-Medina's houses were at lower levels - some 40 to 50 cm lower than the street level. Textual evidence relating to the
front room and its purpose is limited, but Instructions and love poetry both suggest the importance of a private garden for an ancient
Egyptian.
The second room was the  main living room and it stood higher than the first one. The flat roof of the room was supported by one or two
wooden pillars that rested on stone bases. By archaeological evidence it is widely acknowledged that the second room had a sacred
significance. Offering stelae were found near shallow rectangular and arched wall niches, which occur in several houses in the first and
second rooms. Limestone offering tables were found in their vicinity. In the second rooms of most houses false door dedications were
discovered. All this evidence seems to indicate that the second room, among other multiple settings, was used to connect with and gain
protection of those outside the bounds of ordinary moral existence.
Some houses had a small chamber off the second room, which seems to have been used both as a general storeroom and as a place where
someone might sleep. Beyond this room there was a
kitchen and a staircase leading up to the roof, which was partially open to the air to
allow smoke to escape. Two cellars complete the dwell
This breathtakingly beautiful panorama was created by Warwick Barnard of Sydney, Australia, while he was walking across the Theban
      hills in January 2007. The magnificent panorama was rendered from six contiguous images and then processed into a reduced size
image. The original was over 25 MB.
Scroll to the right to view the whole picture.

Photography © Andy Peacock 2007

North-south view of the settlement
East-west view of the settlement and the Western tombs

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

How ancient Egyptians Were cutting the Obelisk from the Granite quarry?

Today, quarrymen cut and carve granite using saws with diamond-edged blades and steel chisels.

But ancient Egyptian quarrymen and stonemasons didn't have these modern tools. How, then, did they quarry and cut such clean lines in their obelisks and other monumental statuary?
To find out how ancient Egyptians quarried huge pieces of granite for their obelisks, i traveled to an ancient quarry in Aswan, located 500 miles south of Cairo. This is where the ancient Egyptians found many of the huge granite stones they used for their monuments and statues.

One of the most famous stones left behind is the Unfinished Obelisk, more than twice the size of any known obelisk ever raised. Quarrymen apparently abandoned the obelisk when fractures appeared in its sides. However, the stone, still attached to bedrock, gives important clues to how the ancients quarried granite.

Archeologist Mark Lehner, a key member of nova expedition, crouches in a granite trench that abuts one side of…

Hesi-re, the first Dentist, in ancient Egypt and in the world

Hesire was a high official who lived during the reign of Netjerikhet (Dosjer) 2686 BC to 2613 BC . His tutelary informs us of the many offices he had held during his life. Thus he was the 'overseer of the royal scribes', at the head of the royal administration of Djoser. His most spectacular title, however, was that of the 'greatest (or chief ?)of physicians and dentists'. It is not entirely clear whether this title infers that Hesire himself was honored as the greatest of physicians and dentists, or rather that he was merely responsible for the administration of physicians and dentists. But whatever the case, the distinction between 'physicians' and 'dentists' in his tutelary does show a high degree of medical specialization at this early stage of the history of Ancient Egypt..

Das Tal der Koenige

Die geographische Lage
Das Gebiet bei Theben lieferte ein vorzügliches Gebiet für das Anlegen einer königlichen Nekropole. Vom Westufer des Nils erstreckt sich eine flache Ebene zu einer Bergkette mit zahlreichen abgeschiedenen Tälern, die sich zwischen hohen Klippen und weichem Gestein durchschlängeln. Die Ebene eignete sich ideal für das Errichten der königlichen Totentempel. Die Täler hingegen boten genügend Platz, um viele kunstvoll in den Fels gehauene Gräber anzulegen. Auch aus symbolischen Gründen wählten die Alten Ägypter diesen Platz für das Errichten einer Nekropole. Blickt man von der Stadt Theben über den Nil auf das thebanische Bergmassiv, dann ähnelt es in der Gestalt einer riesigen Version der Hieroglyphe für "Horizont". Es ist das ägyptische Symbol für das Gebiet der auf- und untergehenden Sonne. Im Neuen…