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Australia’s Egyptian Hieroglyphs


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Located in the National Park forest of the Hunter Valley, 100 km north of Sydney, these ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs have been a part of the local folk lore for years. The hieroglyphs were first discovered in the early 1900′s and contains over 250 glyphs.
You would think that the Australian government would protect this site for its historic value, but that is not the case. Because this site is NON-ABORIGINAL, the Australian government has no desire to protect this site.
Egyptologist Ray Johnson, who has translated extremely ancient texts for the Museum of Antiquities in Cairo, eventually was successful in documenting and translating the two facing walls of Egyptian characters. Which he believes is from the Third Dynasty.
Here is his translation below from the book “THE OZ – EGYPTIAN ENIGMA” – By Paul White
The rock walls chronicle a tragic saga of ancient explorers shipwrecked in a strange and hostile land, and the untimely death of their royal leader, “Lord Djes-eb”. A group of three cartouches (framed clusters of glyphs) record the name of “RA-JEDEF” as reigning King of the Upper and Lower Nile, and son of “KHUFU” who, in turn, is son of the King “SNEFERU”.This dates the expedition just after the reign of King Khufu (known in the Greek as “Cheops” reputed builder of the Great Pyramid) somewhere between 1779 and 2748 BC. Lord Djes-eb may have actually been one of the sons of the Pharaoh Ra Djedef, who reigned after Khufu.The hieroglyphic text was apparently written under the instruction of a ship’s captain or similar, with the corner glyph on the wall displaying the title of a high official or chief priest. The scribe is “speaking for his Highness, the Prince, from this wretched place where we were carried by ship.” The expedition’s leader, as mentioned before is described in the inscriptions as the King’s son, “Lord Djes-eb”, who came to grief a long way from home. The hieroglyphics sketch his journey and his tragic demise:”For two seasons he made his way westward, weary, but strong to the end. Always praying, joyful, and smiting insects. He, the servant of God, said God brought the insects…Have gone around hills and deserts, in wind and rain, with no lakes at hand… He was killed while carrying the Golden Falcon Standard up front in a foreign land, crossing mountains, desert and water along the way. “…….”He, who died before, is here laid to rest. May he have life everlasting. He is never again to stand beside the waters of the Sacred Mer.”…MER meaning “love”. There was a moat around the pyramid called the “waters of Mer” .The second facing wall, which was much more seriously eroded, details the tragedy further. This wall begins with the badly eroded glyph of a snake (Heft), with a glyph of jaws (to bite) and the symbol for “twice”……”The snake bit twice. Those followers of the diving Lord “KHUFU”, mighty one of Lower Egypt, Lord of the Two Adzes, not all shall return. We must go forward and not look back. All the creek and river beds are dry. Our boat is damaged and tied up with rope. Death was caused by snake. We gave egg-yolk from the medicine-chest and prayed to AMEN, the Hidden One, for he was struck twice.” Burial rituals, prayers and preparations are described… “We walled in the side entrance to the chamber with stones from all around. We aligned the chamber with the Western Heavens.” ….The three doors of eternity were connected to the rear end of the royal tomb and sealed in. We placed beside it a vessel, the holy offering, should he awaken from the tomb. Separated from home is the Royal body and all others. “…. The extraordinary 5,000 year-old story of the death and burial of “Lord Djes-eb” one of the sons of the Pharaoh Ra Djedef.
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