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Parts of the body IN HIEROGLYPHS

The hieroglyphs of ancient Egypt are often listed in groups of associated glyphs. The following hieroglyphs have been grouped according to the system established by Sir Alan Gardiner. The following hieroglyphs are all depictions of parts of the body.




 D1; head in profile
D1
Det and Log; Kopf, back of the head, behind, to neglect, forehead, appoint"
 D2; head facing front
D2
Det and Log; face, on, for Phon; Hr
D3; lock of hair
D3
Det and Log; hair, skin, colour, nature, mourn, empty, bald, fall out
 D4; eye
D4
Det and Log; eye, make, see, be blind Phon; ir
 D5; painted eye
D5
Det and Log; eye, make, see, be blind
 D6; painted upper eyelid
D6
Det and Log; eye paint, be beautiful, look, see
 D7; painted lower eyelid
D7
Det and Log; eye paint, be beautiful, look, see
D8; an eye on the sign for land
D8
Det; in Anwu, Ainu
 D9; weeping eye
D9
Det and Log; weep
 D10; Wadjet eye (also called the eye of Horus)
D10
Det and Log; Wadjet eye
 D11; the white of the eye (left)
D11
Abbr; heqat (corn measure)
 D12; pupil
D12
Det; pupil Abbr; heqat (corn measure)
 D13; eyebrow
D13
Abbr; 1/8 heqat (corn measure)
 D13a; two eye brows
D13a
Det; eye brows
 D14; white of the eye (right)
D14
Abbr; 1/16 heqat (corn measure)
 D15; the diagonal line of the Wadjet eye
D15
Abbr; 1/32 heqat (corn measure)
 D16; the verticle line of the Wadjet eye
D16
Abbr; 1/64 heqat (corn measure)
 D17; the verticle and diagonal lines of the Wadjet eye
D17
Det and Log; image
 D18; ear
D18
Det and Log; ear
 D19; eye and cheek
D19
Det and Log; nose, smell, rejoice, face, front, be mild oppose obedient Phon; hnt
 D20; nose and eye
D20
Det and Log; nose, smell, rejoice, face, front, be mild oppose obedient Phon; hnt
 D21; mouth
D21
Log; mouth, spell Phon; r
 D22; mouth with two lines extending from it
D22
Log; 2/3
D23; mouth with three lines extending from it
D23
Log; 3/4
 D24; mouth and upper teeth
D24
Log; edge, lip
 D25; mouth and upper and lower teeth
D25
Log; both lips
 D26; mouth spitting
D26
Det; spit , vomit, blood
 D27; small breast
D27
Det and Log; breast, suckle, tutor
 D27a; large breast
D27a
Det and Log; breast, suckle, tutor
 D28; arms
D28
Phon; kA Log; ka
 D29; arms on a standard
D29
Log; divine ka
 D30; arms on a standard pointing to the side
D30
Det; Nehebkau
D31; arms embracing a pestle
D31
Log; mortuary priest
D32; arms embracing
D32
Det; embrace, hug, spread arms
D33; arms rowing
D33
Log; to row Phon; hn
D34; arms holding a shield and mace
D34
Log; fight
D34a; arms holding a shield and mace
D34a
Log; fight
D35; arms spread; chm in shrine and forget  Phon; n
D35
Log and Det; not, who/which not, ignore Phon Det; hm in shrine and forget; Phon; n
D36; forearm and hand
D36
Log; arm Phon; a
D37; forearm and hand carrying a conical bread loaf
D37
Det; give, to give Phon; D (only in Djedu ) mj (rare), m (in behold)
D38; forearm and hand carrying a round bread loaf
D38
Det; give Phon; mj, m
D39; forearm and hand carrying a round pot
D39
Det; to offer, to present
D40; forearm and hand carrying a crook
D40
Det; strong, beat, strength, Abb; investigate
 D41; forearm plam down
D41
Det; arm, shoulder, left, sing, bend arm, refuse, cease Phon; nj
 D42; straight arm palm down
D42
Det and Log; cubit
 D43; forearm and hand carrying a flail
D43
Det; protect Phon; hw
 D44; forearm and hand carrying a scepter
D44
Det and Log; to guide
D45; forearm and hand carrying a 'Nhet'
D45
Det and Log; be holy
 D46; hand
D46
Log; hand Phon; d
D46a; bleeding hand
D46a
Log; fragrance
D47; hand plam down
D47
Det; hand
 D48; hand without thumb
D48
Log; hand width, palm measure
 D49; fist
D49
Det; grasp
 D50; finger
D50
Det and Log; finger Abb; 10,000
 D50a; fingers
D50a
Det; accurate, precise
 D51; horizontal finger
D51
Det; fingernail, to measure, Phon Det; dor
D52; penis
D52
Det; phallus, male, man Phon; mt or mwt;
 D53; penis emitting fluid
D53
Det; phallus, urinate, semen, husband, man, before
 D54; legs walking
D54
Det and Log; walk, stop, enterprise, come near, not move
 D55; legs walking backwards
D55
Det; back, to return
 D56; leg
D56
Det and Log; leg, thigh
 D57; leg and knife
D57
Det; to wound, be mutilated Phon Det; jat sjat
D58; lower leg
D58
Phon; b Log; place, position
 D59; leg and arm
D59
Phon; ab
 D59; lower leg with water jug
D59
Det and Log; be pure
D61; toes
D61
Det and Log; toe
D62; toes
D62
Det and Log; toe
D63; toes
D63
Det and Log; toe








































































Codes

Abb; the sign is an abbreviation of a word,
Det; the sign acts as a determinative (it has no phonetic value, but provids further information about the full word),
Log; the sign is a logogram (it represents an entire word or idea),
Phon; the sign has a phonetic value, and
Phon Det; the sign is a phonetic determinant (it acts as a determinative but also has a phonetic value).

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